President Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, outlawing segregation in schools and public places.

June 30, 1964, Tuesday. Sick

Nana is so good to me when I’m sick. She turns the lights down low in the living room and plugs a heating pad in right next to her Lazy-Boy chair, so I can find some comfort and watch TV with her. She makes me anything I think I can hold down. I crave chocolate pudding with milk on it. It tastes so good going down, but I throw it up abut 10 minutes later. She gives me a Coke with cream in it. Sometimes it stays down. She gives me a tranquilizer to relax my stomach and a red pill to sleep. Also Excedrin and a hot bath will help me sleep for about four hours. Nana talks to me about Science of Mind while she holds my hand. Her voice puts me to sleep. She gives me her bed and she sleeps on the pull out couch in the living room. She is always cheerful and good to me. I really don’t know what I would do without her kindness when I’m sick.

saffrons rule Maybelline envelope 001

While I was at Nana’s a letter from the Maybelline Company made out to my dad, but with her address on it, came to her apartment.  I imagine it was a dividend check.

maybelline vintage black ad

 1964 was the year that Maybelline dividend checks began to pay off in larger amounts, thanks to Ultra Lash Mascara…That was that product that really sent Maybelline profits off the chart.

 In 1964, Great Lash Mascara was born and featured a beautiful young Black Model, who spoke in code, to the growing liberated female market.  The genius in this Ad was connecting Civil Rights with Women’s Rights.  1964 was the year that changed America, both Culturally and Politically.  

July 1, 1964, Wednesday. Bonnie’s Birthday. Still at Nana’s

 

July 2, 1964. Thursday. Think I’m getting well.  President Johnson signed the Civil Rights Act of 1964, outlawing segregation in schools and public places.  

Drove to the beach with Nana, felt better. Came home and ate a tuna sandwich. Sandy Block called and my stomach started getting nervous again. Nana started talking about my career again. She wants me to continue on where she left off. She was a dancer specializing in Russian Ballet. She thinks I will be an actress and singer if I really push towards it hard. After our talk I threw up my dinner, she so patiently fixed for me. I felt so bad about it. I didn’t sleep at all. I want to be well so much, I feel I’ll never be normal. I also want to go home! I can’t stand this apartment another day…It’s so small, I can’t get away by myself. I am so lonely for my friends.

Martha & The Vandellas “Dancing in the Streets” During the summer of 1964, Martha Reeves’s “Dancing in the Street,” became an unexpected anthem for a nation in the midst of radical social change.

Visit my Maybelline Book Blog at http://www.maybellinebook.com/

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About saffronsrule

Sharrie Williams is the author of The Maybelline Story and a direct descendant of the Maybelline Cosmetic Family. Great niece of Maybelline founder Tom Lyle Williams. Buy a signed copy today.
This entry was posted in 1960's Surf Culture, 1964 High School Diary, Chick Secrets, diary, Maybelline Girl, memoir, REALITY BLOG, Southern California 1964, teenage reality blog and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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